2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660

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edited May 9 in Cars Motorcycles
An all-new model in 2022, the Tiger Sport 660 is an upright urban sportbike, packaged as an asphalt-adventure machine.
An all-new model in 2022, the Tiger Sport 660 is an upright urban sportbike, packaged as an asphalt-adventure machine. (Triumph/)

Ups

  • Triple powerplant provides a broad usable range of power
  • Comfortable riding position and tidy cockpit
  • Versatile performance

Downs

  • Nonadjustable fork dives through its travel under hard braking
  • Engine a bit buzzy above 5,500 rpm
  • Wish it had cruise control

Verdict

Triumph is intent on providing a variety of fairly priced machines that appeal to newer riders or buyers who prioritize bang for their buck. Priced at $9,495, the Tiger Sport 660 hits all the right marks for that crowd. Fun, fast enough, and packed with just the right amount of features, the bike makes for a great commuter while also being capable of comfortable two-up riding and weekend escapes, especially when equipped with Triumph’s optional luggage.

A small TFT screen integrated in a white-on-black LCD display is designed to work with the My Triumph accessory to provide turn-by-turn navigation, phone connectivity, and GoPro control.
A small TFT screen integrated in a white-on-black LCD display is designed to work with the My Triumph accessory to provide turn-by-turn navigation, phone connectivity, and GoPro control. (Triumph/)

Overview

Somewhere along the line, someone figured out that adventure-style motorcycles were more comfortable, practical, and enjoyable over longer distances than just about anything out there. They also noticed that adventure-style motorcycles could really rip along a twisty road with upright ergos, plenty of ground clearance, and good leverage from their wide, one-piece handlebars. Triumph reminds us of those benefits with the Tiger Sport 660, which is billed as an entry point for the larger and more adventure-ready Tiger models in its lineup.

Popularly known for its sportbikes and the modern iterations of its Bonneville, Triumph took interest in the adventure bike market back in the mid-’90s. Taking everything it has learned from its experience with bikes like the Speed Triple, Street Triple, and modern Tiger ADVs, Triumph set its sights on adventure-sport machines like the Tiger Sport 660.

Built around the company’s new 660cc inline-triple, first seen in the Triumph Trident, the Tiger Sport 660 has a very recognizable spec sheet. The engine is untouched when compared to the Trident, the frame is only new in that it uses a sturdier (and longer) subframe, and multiple hard parts are shared between the two platforms.

The Tiger Sport 660 is powered by the same liquid-cooled DOHC three-cylinder engine as the Triumph Trident. Designed to be flexible and user-friendly, the engine is claimed to produce 90 percent of its peak torque from 3,600 rpm to 9,750 rpm.
The Tiger Sport 660 is powered by the same liquid-cooled DOHC three-cylinder engine as the Triumph Trident. Designed to be flexible and user-friendly, the engine is claimed to produce 90 percent of its peak torque from 3,600 rpm to 9,750 rpm. (Triumph/)

Updates for 2022

The Tiger Sport 660 is powered by the same liquid-cooled DOHC three-cylinder engine as the Trident, which produces a claimed 80 hp at 10,250 rpm and 47 pound-feet at 6,250 rpm. The Tiger Sport 660 also shares the same underslung silencer as the Trident, as well as a slip-and-assist clutch.

The tubular steel perimeter frame is nearly identical to the frame found on the Trident, yet the Tiger Sport has a sturdier subframe to support luggage and a higher two-level seat. And while luggage is not available as standard equipment, the bike’s tail includes integrated pannier mounts for easily installing the accessory luggage available through Triumph’s accessories catalog.

The Tiger Sport 660 suspension is a departure from what you’d find on the Trident and is better suited to the longer, more adventurous rides you might take on a bike designed to do it all. A 41mm separate function fork and rear shock with remote hydraulic preload adjustment offer a longer, 5.9 inches of wheel travel front and rear. The Tiger Sport has dedicated geometry too; rake and trail are set at 23.1 degrees and 3.8 inches versus 24.6 degrees and 4.2 inches on the Trident, respectively.

You can see a subtle resemblance to the larger Tiger family members in the front face, in the side cowlings, and even in the large 4.5-gallon fuel tank.

The Tiger Sport 660 is equipped with a simple, manually adjustable windscreen that can be moved up or down with just one hand.
The Tiger Sport 660 is equipped with a simple, manually adjustable windscreen that can be moved up or down with just one hand. (Triumph/)

Pricing and Variants

The Tiger Sport 660 is available in Graphite/Sapphire Black or Lucerne Blue/Sapphire Black colors for $9,495, while stepping up to the more eye-catching Korosi Red/Graphite colors will cost an extra $125.

Optional accessories of note include: Triumph Shift Assist, $265; heated grips, $220; Tire Pressure Monitoring System, $250; integrated panniers, $584.72; LED fog lights, $290; dual comfort low seat, $190; aluminum luggage rack, $150; and twin helmet top box, $325.

Competition

There are a lot of midsize adventure-sport machines these days, each with their own mix of street- and dirt-oriented influences. The Kawasaki Versys 650 and Suzuki V-Strom 650XT/650XT Adventure are the two main options, and actually come at lower cost. Additional considerations include: BMW F 850 GS Adventure/850 GS, BMW F 750 GS, KTM 890 Adventure R/890 Adventure, Husqvarna Norden 901, Kawasaki KLR650, Ducati DesertX, Yamaha Ténéré 700, Yamaha Tracer 9 GT, Triumph Tiger 850 Sport, Royal Enfield Himalayan, and Honda CB500X.

Triumph describes the Tiger Sport 660 as a perfect gateway to larger and more adventure-ready models in its adventure-touring lineup.
Triumph describes the Tiger Sport 660 as a perfect gateway to larger and more adventure-ready models in its adventure-touring lineup. (Triumph/)

Powertrain: Engine, Transmission, and Performance

User-friendly power comes courtesy of Triumph’s 660cc liquid-cooled inline-triple that’s claimed to produce 90 percent of its peak torque from 3,600 rpm to 9,750 rpm. As previously mentioned, claimed horsepower is 80 at 10,250 rpm with 47 pound-feet of peak torque arriving at 6,250 rpm.

The Tiger Sport 660 packs a more than decent midrange punch, with a fantastic spread of power available from about 3,600 to 9,000 rpm—not far from Triumph’s claims. The throttle response is linear and approachable, offering up a user-friendly experience in city riding.

Every crack of the wrist highlights the Tiger’s excellently mapped ride-by-wire throttle, which is free of any flat spots or hiccups and allows the rider to fully enjoy the solid connection between the throttle and rear tire. On throttle or off, the response is never jerky.

In a first test on the Tiger Sport 660, Cycle World commented that the broad powerband added to the bike’s user-friendly nature; even if you’re in the wrong gear, the bike will chug off without complaint. Moreover, the six-speed gearbox is smooth and positive, with an easy pull from the lever on the slip-and-assist clutch.

Handling

A smooth throttle means nothing without good handling, and that’s where the Tiger Sport 660′s steeper rake comes in. “The bike is agile and tips in easily, transitioning smoothly from side to side without feeling twitchy, even at a quick pace,” the Cycle World test team notes. The wide and tall one-piece handlebar provides great leverage, especially when coming into decreasing-radius turns, while midcorner adjustments can be made without the bike complaining or feeling unsettled. Just pick a line and the Tiger holds it throughout.”

Despite its adventurous design, the Tiger Sport 660 is a happy urban commuter.
Despite its adventurous design, the Tiger Sport 660 is a happy urban commuter. (Triumph/)

Brakes

The Tiger Sport 660′s Nissin brake setup may seem middle of the road, but the dual-disc twin-caliper arrangement does a good job of slowing the Tiger down. Pull from the span-adjustable lever is easy, and the only other complaint is that feedback can feel a bit vague.

Fuel Economy and Real-World MPG

Triumph claims 52.2 mpg for the Tiger Sport 660, although Cycle World has yet to record mileage on a road test.

Ergonomics: Comfort and Utility

Triumph took long-range rider comfort into account when going from Trident to Tiger Sport 660, but also had to adapt the riding position to the Tiger’s intended use. The 32.9-inch seat height is 1.1 inches taller than the Trident, and the pillion seat is significantly higher than on the roadster for better passenger visibility. The bike fits riders under 6 feet tall, with Cycle World’s 5-foot-7 tester adding that the tall, wide handlebar offers an easy reach and neutral body positioning.

The cockpit is set up to be tidy; cables are cleanly routed, an easy-to-read TFT gauge serves up basic riding info, and simple-to-use controls are located on a compact switch cube at the left handlebar.

Standard features include Michelin Road 5 tires and twin LED headlights.

The Tiger Sport 660’s 32.9-inch seat height is 1.1 inches taller than the Trident, and the pillion seat is significantly higher than on the roadster for better passenger visibility.
The Tiger Sport 660’s 32.9-inch seat height is 1.1 inches taller than the Trident, and the pillion seat is significantly higher than on the roadster for better passenger visibility. (Triumph/)

Electronics

Ride-by-wire throttle control allows two available ride modes: Road and Rain. Each mode has preset traction-control and throttle-response characteristics. ABS comes standard but does not allow the rider to turn it off, while traction control can be switched off from a menu on the TFT dash, which also provides all riding info and access to mode options. An optional Bluetooth module provides access to the My Triumph app, where you can see navigation options and interact with the bike via your smartphone.

Warranty and Maintenance Coverage

Triumph provides a 24-month, unlimited-mile warranty. Service intervals are every 10,000 miles or 12 months. Triumph claims the service time over the first three years of ownership add up to 8.3 hours of labor compared to a range of 11 to 15.9 hours for its competitors. Triumph asserts this results in 17 percent lower maintenance costs over that time span.

A 23.1-degree rake makes for easy tip-ins on the Tiger, while the longer-travel front suspension is composed enough for all but the harshest bumps.
A 23.1-degree rake makes for easy tip-ins on the Tiger, while the longer-travel front suspension is composed enough for all but the harshest bumps. (Triumph/)

Quality

The fit and finish of Triumph’s motorcycle lineup continues to impress, and that continues to be the case with the Tiger Sport 660.

2022 Triumph Tiger Sport 660 Claimed Specifications

MSRP: $9,495
Engine: 660cc, DOHC, liquid-cooled inline-triple; 12 valves
Bore x Stroke: 74.0 x 51.1mm
Transmission/Final Drive: 6-speed/X-ring chain
Fuel Delivery: Multipoint sequential EFI; ride-by-wire
Clutch: Wet, multiple disc, slip and assist
Engine Management/Ignition: Electronic
Frame: Tubular steel perimeter
Front Suspension: 41mm inverted Showa SFF fork, nonadjustable; 5.9 in. travel
Rear Suspension: Showa monoshock, remote preload adjustable; 5.9 in. travel
Front Brake: Nissin 2-piston sliding calipers, dual 310mm petal discs w/ ABS
Rear Brake: Nissin 1-piston sliding caliper, 255mm disc w/ ABS
Wheels, Front/Rear: Cast aluminum; 17 x 3.5 in. / 17 x 5.5 in.
Tires, Front/Rear: Michelin Road 5; 120/70R-17, 180/55R-17
Rake/Trail: 23.1°/3.8 in.
Wheelbase: 55.8 in.
Ground Clearance: N/A in.
Seat Height: 32.9 in.
Fuel Capacity: 4.5 gal.
Wet Weight: 455 lb.
Contact: triumphmotorcycles.com
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