Your LinkedIn Network Can Help You Land Your Next Job

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edited December 2020 in Work Career





Whether you’re just getting started in your career, looking to make a pivot, or are a seasoned professional seeking a new job, the best people to lean on for support are the people you know. Members like you were 4x more likely to get hired when they leveraged their networks on LinkedIn while job seeking. 

Starting those conversations can be nerve-wrecking though, especially if it’s been a while since you last spoke. To help you overcome any anxiety and inspire that first step, here are a few pointers and conversation starters to try out: 

Identify the people you know 

Your social acquaintances, alumni, and former colleagues are great people to connect with on LinkedIn. Once they’re in your network, you can send them a LinkedIn message to catch up and see how they’re doing. Keeping the relationship fresh makes it easier to reach out the next time you need career advice or a job referral.

Interested in joining a specific company or pursuing a specific role? Use search to filter your connections based on their companies, industries, and job functions. You can also see whether you have any connections who work at a specific company from a company’s page or job listing.








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Start a meaningful conversation

Networking is all about building relationships through authentic conversations. If it’s been a while since you’ve reached out to your connection, lead with curiosity by checking their profile and recent activity to see the latest developments in their career. Use that as inspiration to get the conversation going with a LinkedIn message.  

Here’s an example: 


“Hi Sarah, I can’t believe it’s been 2 years since we last caught up. I noticed you're now at {new company}. How has your transition been?” 

Ask for the help you need

Depending on the stage of your job search, your network can be helpful in a few different ways - for career advice, introductions to others, or a referral for a specific job. Once you’re clear on your goal, provide context and any useful information that can empower your connection to help you out.  

Here’s a few examples: 

Ask for career advice


“As I pursue [your career goal], I’d love to learn more about [your question]. Given your background in [connection’s credentials], I was hoping to schedule a 30-minute video chat with you. Would you be open to that?” 

Ask for an introduction 


“I’m currently interested in pursuing [your next role] and noticed that you are connected to [mutual connection]. I’d appreciate an introduction so that I can learn more about [your question].”

Ask for a referral 


“I noticed that your company is currently hiring for a [your next role] and I’m interested in pursuing the opportunity. Do you mind referring me to the recruiter or hiring manager?”

Invest in the relationship

The strength of your network depends on how well you nurture your relationships over time. Be sure to follow-up by giving people updates on your job search, reporting back on how their advice worked for you, or sending a quick thank you note and offering your support in return.

We’ve also made it easy for you to keep the relationships fresh rather than just reaching out when you need something specific. You can privately share relevant posts from your feed to spark a conversation, schedule coffee chats over video, or start a group conversation among a few people you know who share the same interests. 

These small steps can have a mutually beneficial and positive impact within your career and community. 

Have a success story to share? 

If you’ve had success landing a new job on LinkedIn, we want to hear from you! Share a LinkedIn post with your #SmallStep to inspire others to do the same. 

Until then, check out more tips and information on how to use LinkedIn.



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